“Clay House”: A Middle Grade Paranormal Horror Novel

Clay House

Sometimes evil dwells in the land itself, and it can burrow deep, laying dormant for a long time. But it always awakens eventually.

Moving to a new home is never easy, especially when you have to deal with a not so nice step-father, and the house is old and spooky. The town is quick to fill her in on the mysterious stories about her house, and when she finds a cemetary in her new back yard and her little brother Mark starts behaving oddly, Tatiana begins to get scared. The increasing cruelness of her step-father, leads her to uncover another kind of secret. Now all she has to do is figure out what to do with what she knows.

The bonus story, “Olney”, which is included with Clay House, is equally well-written with a similar theme, providing extra reader value for your book buck.

With two brave young heroines and two spine chilling ghosts, resulting in two well-crafted stories filled with twists and turns to keep readers guessing, I give Clay House five quills.

Five Quills

Kaye Lynne Booth does honest book reviews on Writing to be Read in exchange for ARCs. Have a book you’d like reviewed? Contact Kaye at kayebooth(at)yahoo(dot)com.


“Monsterland”: Vampires and Werewolves and Zombies, Oh My!

Monsterland

I recently had the privilage of reading Monsterland, the new release by Michael Okon. It”s an entertaining little tale about a new kind of theme park, filled with zombies, vampires and werewolves of the very real kind. There are Monsterland theme parks opening all over the world and Monsterland’s creator, Dr. Vincent Konrad intends to give new meaning to the idea of family entertainment, handing out free tickets to Wyatt and his friends. Wyatt and his friends are stoked about the grand opening of the newest innovation in theme parks, featuring real live vampires, werewolves and zombies. Finally, they’ll be able to settle their age old debate over which is the ultimate monster. Monsterland holds all the answers.

Dr. Konrad is looked upon as a savior because everyone knows the monsters are only unfortunate victims of the infections that created them, and he is offering them a haven after years of living on the edges of civilization, shunned and feared. But Carter, Wyatt’s step-dad, doesn’t see it that way. He senses that Konrad isn’t telling the whole story and he has his doubts about the intelligence of bringing the public into the midst of such dangerous creatures.

As the teens move through the Monsterland tour, things begin to go awry, and Wyatt starts to suspect that Carter is right. It seems Dr. Konrad isn’t saving the monsters, he’s exploiting them and instead of being scared, Wyatt feels kind of sad. When the werewolves plan a revolt to regain their freedom, the frights aren’t for fun anymore, and Wyatt and his friends and family will be lucky to get out alive.

The idea of Monsterland is a good one, with a few different subplots branching off the main plot line to keep things moving forward. Younger readers may enjoy the comic book-like characters Okon creates by humanizing the monsters, he made them seem more pathetic than scary, but I had trouble buying in. I give it three quills.

Three Quills3


“Scarlett Wrigley and the Light Beneath the Veil”: A delightful middle-grade fantasy

scarlett-wrigley-and-the-light-beneath-the-veil

From the very start, Scarlett Wrigley and the Light Beneath the Veil, by Charmaine Mullins-Jaime, grabs readers interest and holds it, no matter their age.The characters are colorful, likable and fully developed. The plot is easy to follow and easy to buy-in to.

Scarlett is special from the day she was born and Scarlett Wrigley and the Light Beneath the Veil takes us on the magical journey of her coming of age. At the age of thirteen, Scarlett learns about the magical world which is and has always been around her, but now she is able to see beneath the veil which hides it. Who would have guessed that three fairies, a leprechaun and a bogey all lived under the Wrigley roof with Scarlett and her family, or that a bad elf would try to trick her into going with him to meet an evil goblin.

As Scarlett learns more and more about this strange other world, which she’s discovered exists along side her own, her own world is turned upside down, but in a good way, as she learns how to awaken her own powers. And she also learns that someone wants her mother dead and she holds the power to save her.

Scarlett Wrigley and the Light Beneath the Veil is a well-crafted story that will delight readers of all ages. I give it five quills.

Five Quills3

Kaye Lynne Booth does honest book reviews on Writing to be Read in exchange for ARCs at no charge. Have a book you’d like reviewed? Contact Kaye at kayebooth(at)yahoo(dot)com.