Treasuring Poetry – Meet fantasy author and poet, Diana Peach and read my review of Sunwielder: An Epic Time Travel Adventure

Welcome to the first Treasury Poetry post of 2021.

Today, I am delighted to welcome fantasy author and poet, Diana Peach, who is sharing one of her own poems and discussing poetry.

Which of your own poems is your favourite?

Thanks so much for the invitation to participate in your Treasuring Poetry series, Robbie. I’m honored. I think of myself as a writer of prose and a dabbler otherwise, but I love poetry and believe no creative effort is ever wasted.

This is a super hard question! I have poems that I think are well-crafted, poems that evoke personal feelings or memories, and poems that reflect a particular time in my life. Since “I don’t know” isn’t an acceptable answer, I’ll go with this one:

Flight of faith

When I was a child, I could fly

you and I hopped in dirt-road afternoons

faithful

and the dust-wind flung us over seas of wheat

scuffed shoes skimming the feathered awns

we whipped around the corners of the barn

in a home-sewn world of farm-hewn hands

our secret futures soared

***

In the veins of my hands

the blue brooks of time stream by

Somewhere on the way, I unlearned how to fly

and trod worn paths through autumn’s lea

snapped night’s brittle ice

shards of fractured faith

glinting in my wake

***

Today’s morning purls in plumrose

cast on a withering season’s stark debris

spangled with winter’s gilded rime

a new path of violet ice wends to the horizon

fragile, fissured, a wish yet unbroken

my secret future soars

faithful

and I wonder if I might

fly one last time

What inspired you to write this particular poem?

In my twenties, I used to have flying dreams rather frequently. They were the most vivid dreams of my life. I was truly flying. I could feel the wind on my face as if I was awake and standing outside on a breezy day. The sensory experience was exhilarating.

This poem is based on one of those dreams. In the dream, I was about 10 years old, an unremarkable child of the dusty American plains. Every day, the school bus would drop my friend and me off at the side of the dirt road, and as soon as the bus drove away, we would hop a few steps, then pick up our feet and soar over the fields, our brown shoes skimming the wheat. Despite our ordinary lives and pervasive poverty, we were extraordinary. Life was full of magic and promise, and nothing could hold us down.

Then I stopped having flying dreams and haven’t had one in nearly 35 years. This poem is about that amazing childhood belief that anything is possible, about its loss, and about the yearning to fly again.

Which genre of poetry do you enjoy writing the most and why?

I enjoy Colleen Chesebro’s weekly syllabic poetry challenges. The poetic forms provide structure, and for me, they’re like puzzles as I search for the words that conform to the syllable count, structure, prompts, and personal meaning. But my favorites among the poems I’ve written are all free form. They’re harder

for me to craft, but they feel more organic, untouched by stylistic constraints. They’re pure gut, emotion, and inspiration.

Which genre of poetry do you enjoy reading the most?

Probably free form poetry, though any kind of poetry has the potential to make me gasp at its beauty. I love vivid imagery and poignant emotion, poems that illuminate the human condition in a way that pierces my heart. I like poems that stir something personal, or that draw me in and grab hold so that when I finish reading, I feel like I’ve stepped outside myself into someone else’s experience.

Do you think your poetry compliments your other writing or do you see it as an undertaking that stands alone?

Complements, definitely!

I love poetic prose, and when I’m reading fiction, I’m prone to highlighting passages in books where the word choice, imagery, metaphors, or phrases make me swoon. Poetry emphasizes beautifully crafted language, including its sounds and rhythms. It requires a writer to capture and convey the core essence of a story. I think poetry fosters an underlying sensitivity to those aspects of writing in general, and prose benefits from the same attention.

Thanks again, Robbie, for the invite and for allowing me to share my thoughts and muse over this lovely artform. Happy Writing to all the poets out there.

Thank you, Diana, for being my Treasuring Poetry guest. I really enjoyed your poem and insights into your poetry writing.

Sunwielder: An Epic Time Travel Adventure

What Amazon says

In a land on the brink of war, Gryff Worden discovers his family slaughtered, his farm in ruin.

Mortally wounded, he stumbles upon a timekeeper, an old woman of the northern forests, one who tracks the infinite paths of each life. She offers him a sunwield, a medallion promising to return him to the pivotal choices that swayed his life’s journey. Her only condition—he must wear the bronze charm until the end.

Now his story remakes itself, casting him backward in time to moments of decision and death. His old life gone, he no longer remembers the purpose of the medallion burning his chest. As he uncovers the sunwield’s power, new choices lead him on an epic adventure through war, death, friendship, life, and love.

My review

I do not read a lot of fantasy books, but I make an exception for D. Wallace Peach as her books are extraordinary and unique.

Gryff Worden is an ordinary man who just wants to help his uncle and aunt raise horses on their farm while raising his own family. Gryff adores his wife and two children, but there is bad blood between Gryff and the son of the Earl who rules his area. The hostility is emanates from Brant Loden’s side only, but it changes the course of Gryff’s life.

Gryff’s country is attacked by an aggressive nation who want to enslave his people and he is eventually morally wounded and his family murdered by enemy soldiers. At the time of his death he is visited by an elderly prophet who offers him another chance at life if he accepts the sunwielder, a bronze medallion which allows him to go back in time and revise decisions he made thereby changing his life’s path. I thought this concept was clever and unique. I have read other books where the hero can go back in time, but this particular method and the limited number of life choices offered by the sunwielder was something quite different and fascinating.

Gryff is a wonderful character, he is a good man and tries to do the right thing in all situations but he is human and, therefore, susceptible to various human failings like anger and resentment. It was most interesting to experience his going back in time and having to try an alternative approach when his previous choice failed. As Gryff moved further along his path, his choices improved and his self control and discipline increased allowing him to make better choices earlier and without constant intervention.

There is a love story thread that runs through the book and this is intriguing as the reader doesn’t know how his relationships with his wife and with his lover are going to turn out – his destiny in this regard is unclear for most of the book.

There are a number of characters in this book and it provides great insight into the frailties of men and how arrogance, greed, and hunger for power can destroy individuals and the people around them. Good leadership is a strong theme in this book and the importance of strategy and leadership in war and battles is highlighted.

The author writes the most beautiful and powerful prose and even without the incredible story, this book would have been worth reading just to experience the skillful writing. I highly recommend this book to lovers of fantasy and those who enjoy excellent writing.

Purchase Sunwielder: An Epic Time Travel Adventure

Sunwielder: An Epic Time Travel Adventure by [D. Wallace Peach]

Amazon US

About Diana Peach

D. Wallace Peach started writing later in life after the kids were grown and a move left her with hours to fill. Years of working in business surrendered to a full-time indulgence in the imaginative world of books, and when she started writing, she was instantly hooked. Diana lives in a log cabin amongst the tall evergreens and emerald moss of Oregon’s rainforest with her husband, two dogs, bats, owls, and the occasional family of coyotes.

Contact and purchase links

Website/Blog: http://mythsofthemirror.com

Website/Books: http://dwallacepeachbooks.com

Amazon Author’s Page: https://www.amazon.com/D.-Wallace-Peach/e/B00CLKLXP8

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Myths-of-the-Mirror/187264861398982

Twitter: @dwallacepeach

About Robbie Cheadle

IMG_9902

Robbie Cheadle has published nine books for children and one poetry book. She has branched into writing for adults and young adults and, in order to clearly separate her children’s books from her adult books, is writing for older readers under the name Roberta Eaton Cheadle.

Robbie Cheadle’s Sir Chocolate children’s picture books are written in sweet, short rhymes which are easy for young children to follow and are illustrated with pictures of delicious cakes and cake decorations. Each book also includes simple recipes or biscuit art directions which children can make under adult supervision. Her books for older children also incorporate recipes that are relevant to the storylines.

Roberta Eaton Cheadle’s supernatural stories combine fabulous paranormal elements with fascinating historical facts.

Children’s picture books – available as a square book and an A5 book (co-authored with Michael Cheadle):
Sir Chocolate and the strawberry cream story and cookbook
Sir Chocolate and the baby cookie monster story and cookbook
Sir Chocolate and the sugar dough bees story and cookbook
Sir Chocolate and the Condensed Milk River story and cookbook
Sir Chocolate and the Sugar Crystal Caves story and cookbook
Sir Chocolate and the Fondant Five story and cookbook
Sir Chocolate and the Ice Cream Rainbow Fairies story and cookbook

Middle school books:
Silly Willy Goes to Cape Town (includes five fun party cake ideas)
While the Bombs Fell (co-authored with Elsie Hancy Eaton)

Poetry book:
Open a new door (co-authored with Kim Blades)

Supernatural fantasy YA novel:
Through the Nethergate

Horror Anthologies (edited by Dan Alatorre):
Spellbound
Nightmareland
Dark Visions

Paranormal Anthologies (edited by Kaye Lynne Booth):
Spirits of the West
Whispers of the Past

Murder mystery Anthology (edited by Stephen Bentley)
Death Among Us

Find Robbie Cheadle

Blog: https://bakeandwrite.co.za/

Blog: robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com

Twitter: BakeandWrite

Instagram: Robbie Cheadle – Instagram

Facebook: Sir Chocolate Books

Want to be sure not to miss any of Robbie’s “Treasuring Poetry” segments? Subscribe to Writing to be Read for e-mail notifications whenever new content is posted or follow WtbR on WordPress.


193 Comments on “Treasuring Poetry – Meet fantasy author and poet, Diana Peach and read my review of Sunwielder: An Epic Time Travel Adventure”

  1. I very much enjoyed reading Dianna’s poem, and learning about her life and writing more generally. Kevin

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Reblogged this on Robbie's inspiration and commented:

    Today I am hosting Diana Wallace Peach as my first Treasuring Poetry guest of 2021. Diana is a fantastic poet and fantasy writer and has a number of wonderful books. I have shared my review of Sunwielder in this post. Thank you Kaye Lynne Booth of Writing to be Read for hosting us.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Toni Pike says:

    I loved this interview – two brilliant writers together, and it was so wonderful to learn more about Diana’s poetry. I adored that line, “my secret future soars.” A fantastic review, Robbie. Toni x

    Liked by 3 people

  4. Darlene says:

    I love this poem and the story of another prairie girl believing that anything is possible. Diana has such a marvellous way with words.

    Liked by 3 people

  5. beetleypete says:

    Great to see these two lovely writers and bloggers featured. This is a wonderful community to be a part of.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. What a lovely poem. I remember Diana talking about her flying dreams. She is such a talented writer and a great person too! Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. Gwen M. Plano says:

    What a beautiful poem! When I was in my early twenties, I used to have dreams in which I was flying, soaring high. I haven’t thought much about those dreams until now. 😊 Thank you for the great interview. I really liked getting to know Diana better. And, Robbie, your review was fantastic!

    Liked by 3 people

  8. balroop2013 says:

    It’s nice to see Diana here and that’s an awesome poem! I have read it twice and each time I said – wow! The alliteration and the imagery won my heart. Thank you for making my morning so pleasant with your words dear friends. Stay blessed!

    Liked by 3 people

  9. It was a nice surprise to see the return of Treasuring Poetry, and Diana is the perfect writer to launch the new year. I enjoyed reading “Flight of Faith” and the childhood memories that inspired it. I’ve had one dream of flying that I can recall, which was hovering and twirling across a meadow. I hated to wake up from it. I concur with Diana’s comments about poetic prose. When the two come together, it’s magic.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Hi Liz, I also agreed with that comment. My poetry and prose blend and compliment each other too. I used have a recurring dream that I was in in a canoe trying to find my way through a water maze. I could hear my dad but I couldn’t find him anywhere. I used to wake up in a cold sweat. I had this dream repetitively for years. Isn’t it strange how certain things come out while we sleep.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Dreams are fascinating, aren’t they? I’m glad I don’t wake up in a cold sweat. I have a number of repeat dreams, including one where I write a book. I distinctly remember writing the whole thing but when I wake up, I have no memory of the story. I go to sleep, remember it with fascination and kick myself for forgetting, and then wake up and it’s gone again. So weird. 😀

        Liked by 2 people

      • You’re right. There are times when my subconscious just churns in my sleep.

        Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks so much, Liz. I’m so glad you’ve experienced a flying dream, a good one that you didn’t want to wake from. They’re amazing, aren’t they? I think writing poetry is a good exercise for prose writers even if written in secret and never shared. It stretches our skills. And I’ve read some beautiful poems from you too. 🙂 Happy Weekend.

      Liked by 3 people

  10. Thank you so much for the wonderful interview post, Robbie. It’s a pleasure to be featured on Kaye Lynne’s blog, and I’m so honored by your offer to share, not only my thoughts about poetry, but a “favorite” poem and its significance. And thank you kindly for the review of Sunwielder – you really do make an author jump for joy. Yay! I’m so glad you enjoyed the book. Have a wonderful weekend and be well. ❤ (I'll happily reblog on Monday).

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Wonderful interview. As usual, I learned something new about Diana. And I loved being reminded of how addicting Sunwielder was.

    Liked by 3 people

  12. memadtwo says:

    What a great review and interview Robbie. I love Diana’s flying poem too. It’s a wonderful reflection of the wonder of childhood. (K)

    Liked by 3 people

  13. petespringerauthor says:

    Wow! Incredible review, Robbie. I love Diana’s vivid descriptive writing. I think you may have met your twin in terms of finding someone who has as many irons in the fire as you.😉

    Liked by 3 people

    • HI Pete, I agree that Diana has the most amazing descriptive writing skills. Her poetry is also wonderful. I often read things that Diana writes and have a secret chuckle that she is a lot like me.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks for the great comment, Pete. I’m flattered. 🙂 And, oh goodness, I wish I was as organized and productive as Robbie. She’s amazing – writing, reading, reviewing, blogging, poetry, prose, kids, a job. Yeesh. I don’t know when she sleeps! Have a wonderful Sunday and week ahead. Be well. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

  14. I’m not sure which I enjoyed more, the poem or the backstory to the poem. What a fine interview and review of a fine poet, author and blogger.

    Liked by 3 people

  15. dgkaye says:

    I so enjoyed learning more of Diana’s insights. I wonder if Diana was astral planing when she knew she was flying? I’m sure she could do it again if she focused. 🙂 And fab interview. Diana’s books, despite the fantasy, all carry some real world issues. ❤

    Liked by 3 people

  16. Diana’s writing is lyrical and beautiful and now I see why. She’s a dreamer 🙂
    Awesome review, Robbie. I haven’t read Sunweilder yet, it sounds amazing!

    Liked by 3 people

  17. Wonderful poetry Diana and loved your flying dream… pure escapism and just what we need at the moment…I enjoy Colleen’s challenge too and looking forward to getting back to it soon..I also enjoy free form poetry and need to make time to explore it more terrific review Robbie and thanks Kaye Lynne for hosting… x

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Reblogged this on Myths of the Mirror and commented:
    I’m delighted to be the guest of wonderful author and blogger Robbie Cheadle on her first Treasuring Poetry post of 2021! I share a poem, its inspiration, and a few thoughts on how poetry influences our prose. If you have a minute or two, stop by. And thank you to Kaye Lynne Booth for hosting us. Enjoy! ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  19. this was a joy to read, I love this poem, you have such a great writing style. I love these words, so great!

    In the veins of my hands

    the blue brooks of time stream by

    Somewhere on the way, I unlearned how to fly

    and trod worn paths through autumn’s lea

    snapped night’s brittle ice

    shards of fractured faith

    glinting in my wake

    Liked by 3 people

  20. Thanks for another view of Diana and her writing Robbie. You are both gifted writers. I love and share Diana’s love for good prose that evokes strong feeling with beautiful language or new ways of looking at the world. May we fly free on wings of love and imagination.

    Liked by 3 people

  21. Kudos, Diana and Robbie. This is a delightful post. I was never any good at all with poetry, but I admire those who are. Lots of talent here. I love that quote too. Hugs all around.

    Liked by 3 people

  22. D.L. Finn, Author says:

    I loved the poem. It brought back to the innocence and hope of childhood. Great question and answers. I feel the same about the puzzle of symbolic poetry. It reminds me of combining math to the creativity of words. Free verse has always been my go to and where I can fully express myself. Yet, I’m enjoying all forms of poetry and the avenues they offer.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I think we’re on the same page, Denise, when it comes to poetry. There’s so much flexibility in form and style. The more I read, the more I’m in awe at the beautiful craftsmanship and rich feelings it evokes. Thanks for the visit and lovely comment. Have a wonderfully creative week, my friend. 😀

      Liked by 2 people

    • Hi Denise, I also enjoy free verse, but I also like rhyming verse. I find rhyming can be quite challenging sometimes. Tanka’s are my favourite form of syllabic poetry. I am enjoying reading your poetry on your blog and I appreciate all the different styles you use.

      Liked by 2 people

  23. An absolute joy to read, Robbie and Diana! Thanks so much for sharing this with us. Cheers to you both! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  24. At 77, I still fly on occasion in my dreams. It’s a bit poetic. I start off running down a hill, each stride growing longer until suddenly I am up in the air, soaring. Unless there are power lines. Then my soaring is limited. Sigh. But I have never hit the power lines. It could be worse.
    Enjoyed the poem. A lot. Thanks. –Curt

    Liked by 3 people

  25. acflory says:

    I’m not a poetry person so I feel like a bit of an intruder here, but I just wanted to say that Sunweilder was my favourite book for a long time until Unravelling the Veil came along. Awesome review. Cheers, all.

    Liked by 3 people

  26. Robbie – What a great review of Diana’s book. Your ability to create a review that had me visualize the story really stuck with me.

    Diana – love the review….book sounds awesome. Your poem struck a familiar chord with me, but I didn’t recognize what it was until I read the background behind your motivation…..flying dreams. I had totally forgotten about those. I had them very frequently when I was younger and had forgotten all about them until I read this. Suddenly a number of them came back to me with such clarity. I miss that feeling!!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks so much for the lovely comment, Kirt. Robbie wrote a wonderful review, and I couldn’t be more delighted. The book is about five years old, but still dear to me. And I’m so glad that the poem and explanation reminded you of your own flying dreams. Aren’t they wonderful? Oh, to have that feeling again. I would love it. 🙂 Wishing you a week full of creativity. Be well.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Kirk, I am really pleased you enjoyed my review. I have never had a flying dream, but they sound really fun. Thanks for visiting and commenting.

      Liked by 2 people

  27. Mae Clair says:

    I really enjoyed Sun Wielder. Then again, I love everything Diana writes. Her books are always so vivid, lyrical and complex.

    I loved the poem, too. It touched on a subject I love–dreams of flying. They are something I have every so often and have had for decades. I can soar! I just had one last week, and there is no better feeling. I always said if I could have a super power it would be the ability to fly.

    Great post, Robbie and Diana, and congrats on the review to Diana!

    Liked by 3 people

  28. Thank you for a wonderful review, on a very interesting book, i now have to read for the same enjoyment. Michael

    Liked by 3 people

  29. C.E.Robinson says:

    Robbie & Diana, I loved the flying poem & the interview. Knowing more about my virtual author friends & their successes makes me stay in the writing game. I can relate to poetry helping the writer. Years ago that’s how I started. Writing books (coauthoring) followed. On my own now, I’m finishing my first book. I’m easing into reading fantasy & Sci-fi stories. I’ve started with Teagan’s books and Diana’s Sunwielder will be next, after reading all the comments. Robbie, I have 4 great-grandchildren and your cook books for kids are on my to buy list. Happy writing. 📚🎶Christine

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks for the wonderful comment, Christine. I agree with you that it’s fun to learn more about our blogging/writing friends and their journeys, and I enjoy the creativity as well as the tips! I’m so glad that you enjoyed the poem and Robbie’s review. She’s an amazing talent, and I couldn’t be more pleased with her kind words. The last I remember, I think you were querying agents. Is that where you are in the process? I wish you the best of luck in your own journey.

      Liked by 3 people

      • C.E.Robinson says:

        Diana, I’m excited. I just ordered your book, Sunwielder. It should arrive this Friday. It will be my adventure into fantasy. I’m learning so much from my virtual author friends about writing. You and Robbie are great writers & teachers. So, the querying process is on hold. I’m half way through a final edit & rewrite before querying again. Work with a screenwriter friend has helped me see what is confusing, not needed and what stops the story flow. And my help with her screenplay has given me a closer look at dialogue and scene structure. I love it. I may just attempt a screenplay after the book is published. Onward & upward. Thanks so much for your good wishes on my writing journey. 📚🎶 Christine

        Liked by 3 people

        • Congratulations, Christine, I also find the learning and editing stages of writing very interesting, exciting and rewarding. I am sure you will love Sunwielder, it is such a well written and interesting story.

          Liked by 3 people

        • C.E.Robinson says:

          Thanks so much, Robbie. The final editing stage has made me realize how much I missed the first & second time. What my editor suggested from the beginning I’m finally doing. The story flows so much better. And more conflict is involved. I’m looking forward to reading Diana’s book. Into the world of fantasy, I go. 📚🎶Christine

          Liked by 2 people

        • I went over to your blog and then I remembered your lovely post about your muses.

          Liked by 3 people

        • C.E.Robinson says:

          Thank you, Robbie. Diana got a lot of response on her Muse Challenge. It was fun and a great meet up for the blogging community. 📚🎶 Christine

          Liked by 2 people

        • That’s exciting news, Christine. One of the benefits of helping each other is we learn as both the helper and helpee. 🙂 Keep going and enjoy the process. ❤

          Liked by 2 people

        • C.E.Robinson says:

          Thank you, Diana. 💛 I think the key in writing & editing is to let the characters come alive & drive the story. Their dialogue and actions weave around the plot. I’ve been led into scenes by characters that are unbelievably real. And their conflicts keep coming. I’m not making things too easy for the protagonist. She needs to suffer until the victorious end. Now if that isn’t fun? 🤣 🎶📚 Christine

          Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you, Christine, you are very kind. I love Teagan’s books and enjoy her blog serials too. Sunwielder is terrific. I have also read Soul Swallowers and that was also unique and interesting.

      Liked by 3 people

  30. restlessjo says:

    Here we are again, and Diane seems to draw people to her like a magnet 🙂 🙂 Was it just a few days ago I was reading her review of Liesbet’s book Plunge? I agree wholeheartedly with what she says about the writer’s craft and beautiful prose. That poem soars. It’s a very supportive world , this place where we blog. Nice to spend time here, Robbie.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you for visiting and commenting. Diana does draw people, I have also noticed that. She reads and reviews people’s books and writes wonderful prompts which makes her blog very interesting. Of course, she is also a wonderful writer and her books are entertaining and beautifully written.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks for the fun comment, Jo. I haven’t read Liesbet’s book yet, but it’s on my radar. I know we’ve crossed paths though. I’m so glad you enjoyed the poem and interview. Robbie is one of the busy, friendly, and talented authors that makes WP so welcoming, and I was over the moon when she asked if I’d share a poem. Have a wonderful day and be well. 😀

      Liked by 3 people

  31. Norah says:

    I listened to the audiobook of Diana’s Sunwielder and thoroughly enjoyed it. I agree with you in saying that Diana has excellent writing. Sunwielder is different from anything else I have read. The story is complex and imaginative and her language is beautiful with each word aptly chosen. I would say that for her poem as well. It is beautiful in thought and words and I love the way she describes it as remembering a frequent dream of flying. I haven’t dreamed of flying in the sleep dream sense, but would love to be able to fly.
    Great interview.

    Liked by 3 people

  32. patgarcia says:

    Hi Diana, Hi Robbie,

    Diana, Robbie’s review of your book hooked me into putting it on my TBR list. Your poetry at the beginning made me think about my childhood. I used to love to lay on the ground and look toward Heaven and watch the clouds in all their funny shapes move. Thank you for an engaging post.

    Robbie, thank you for the review and for hosting Diana.

    Wishing both of you all the best for 2021.

    Shalom aleichem

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks so much for stopping by, Pat, and for adding the book to your list. Yay! And I’m glad that the poem brought back some childhood memories. I love poems that feel personal and do that for me. Have a wonderful day and be well. Happy Writing!

      Liked by 3 people

    • Hi Pat, thank you for visiting us here. Diana writes lovely books and I am sure you will enjoy Sunwielder. I also used to lie on the ground watching the clouds as a child. I can just picture us as children, on opposite sides of the world, looking at cloud pictures. Isn’t that a lovely thought?

      Liked by 3 people

  33. Teri Polen says:

    I loved Diana’s poem! I used to dream I could fly (it’s still my choice of superhero power). Great interview Diana and Robbie!

    Liked by 3 people

  34. markbierman says:

    Diana, you have a way of word smithing that conjures such vivid images in the mind! I’m not an avid reader of fantasy, either, but in your case, I agree with Robbie. Well done! Thank you, Robbie, for sharing this and all the best on your new blog creation!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks so much for the great comment, Mark. I’m always on the look out for converts over to the fantasy genre. Ha ha. I used to only read fantasy, but reading the books of other bloggers has broadened my vista. I’ve happily learned that a well-written book is enjoyable in any genre. It’s been fun to discover that I enjoy memoirs, historical fiction, mysteries, and thrillers like yours. 🙂 Happy Writing!

      Liked by 3 people

    • Hi Mark, thank you for visiting Diana and I here. I am really enjoying these Treasuring Poetry posts. I enjoy reading people’s poems and thoughts about poetry.

      Liked by 2 people

  35. olganm says:

    I’m not a big reader of fantasy either, but it sounds like quite a read, and loved Diana’s poem and her explanation of its origin. Fascinating! I hope we all might fly again at some point. ♥

    Liked by 3 people

  36. I learned so much about Diana here, Robbie, which means it’s an excellent post/interview by you! I always think of Diana in the sense of great fantasy writing, but yes, the times she posts poems I delve right into them. Diana’s poems are ACCESSIBLE. I’m able to read the poem and see the poet in it, as well as myself. Perhaps that sounds odd, but hopefully you know what I mean. I studied poetry in my English grad school classes, and what annoyed me the most was that I was supposed to study the poet’s life to understand his/her poems. In my mind, a good poem can just be read by anyone, and appreciated on its own merit, not needing to know the entire background of the poet. Anyway, Diana’s poems are lyrical and sometimes mystical, but always understandable. And I really get INTO the poem. This one on flying I loved, since I’ve also flown many times in dreams, and always wish to fly more.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I’m not surprised at all, Pam, that you have flying dreams. You have an openness to spirit that facilitates the ability to soar. ❤ What a glorious feeling. I wish those dreams were more frequent in my life! And thank you for the wonderful comment, so full of insight. I love poetry that leaks beautiful words and imagery, but like you, the ones that leave lasting impressions are those that move me, that pull me into the experience. And I agree… they're accessible. I also remember having to dissect poetry in school. It wasn't a bad experience, but it also isn't how I read or enjoy poetry now. I'm so glad you enjoyed this. Have a beautiful day, my friend. ❤ ❤

      Liked by 2 people

    • I really enjoyed this post of Diana’s too, Pam. I agree that she is a great fantasy writer, but also an excellent poet. My children study poetry in a much better way than I ever did and I often pinch their poetry notes and read them. I sometimes think how much I would have enjoyed their schooling syllabus which is so much better and more engaging than my own was. I have never flow in a dream but I have rowed a canoe around a water maze every night for about 5 years.

      Liked by 3 people

  37. […] Head over to find out more about Diana’s favourite poetry and her books: Treasury of Poetry – Diana Wallace Peach and a review of Sunwielder by Robbie Cheadle […]

    Liked by 3 people

  38. I enjoyed this post, Robbie and Diana. I’ve learned so much about Diana from this interview. It fascinates me to read Diana’s fantasy novels. Her writing drew me into her mind and see vividly her world of imagination. Once in a while, I read her poetry on her blog and those poems did the same to me. I felt like sitting beside her to view her environment at the time, share her reflections and surprising insights in her poems, and loved the ones included in this post.

    I had many flying dreams as a child and the imagery is still vivid. I too studied dreams when I studied counseling, not a good Freudian, but preferred more of scientific discovery about the brain and sleep. The study about dreams doesn’t spoil my wonderful feeling about flying and wish to fly again one more time!

    Liked by 3 people

  39. mydangblog says:

    Such beautifully rendered imagery in that poem–really breathtaking, Diana! I can see why it’s your favourite!

    Liked by 3 people

  40. cath says:

    Love this poem, Diana, especially the last few lines, a beautiful choice, and I could identify with your thoughts on finding poetic turns in prose. What an interesting post.

    Liked by 3 people

  41. Prior... says:

    great post and it was nice to learn more about Diana –
    😉
    and i also like the free form poetry!
    and cheers to robbie also – both of you have your own signature writing ☀️😊

    Liked by 3 people

  42. Wow, a beautiful poem Diana! The opening line, “When I was a child, I could fly…” immediately invites the reader in. I enjoyed reading inspiration behind the poem too. Even though I’ve read short poems on your blog, this is the first time I read a long poem by you. This is really an amazing feature of your poetry writing, and thanks to Robbie for the introduction. Now, I’m on the lookout for your book of poetry. 🙂 ❤

    Liked by 2 people


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